Volume 3, Number 1

May 2023

Welcome to Volume 3, Number 1

It is my pleasure to introduce the Canadian Journal of Emergency Management’s Spring 2023 edition.  This edition contains two peer reviewed academic articles, one “bridging the gap” article, an interview transcript as well as a special communication from the Insurance Bureau of Canada.

We at CJEM would first like to thank the numerous researchers and writers who contributed their work to this edition. Through publishing their work with CJEM, these individuals have made an important contribution to existing knowledge in the field of disaster and emergency management.  I am confident that these contributions will be put to good use by practitioners as well as researchers for the benefit of all Canadians.

I would also like to thank our readers and subscribers.  Whether you are an emergency management practitioner, a researcher, curious about emergency management in the Canadian context, or some combination of these, we hope the articles contained in this edition further your understanding of emergency management.

 

Alexander Fremis

Editor in Chief

Canadian Journal of Emergency Management

From Can Pac Swire (CC-BY-NC-2.0).

Dynamic deployment models for high-performance Emergency Medical Services

Michael Bosnyak

While the emergency medical services profession has evolved substantially, the way that paramedic resources respond to these incidents has stayed relatively the same, mostly mirroring deployment models utilized by fire departments. The problem is that fire and paramedic services require two very different types of staffing…For the purposes of this study, the deployment plans at two of Ontario’s largest and busiest paramedic services (referred to as Service A and Service B) were examined, to determine how different deployment models help paramedic services adapt to their call volume and remain prepared for larger-scale emergency responses. 

Read more

Photo by John Coley (CC-BY-2.0).

Emergency Planning Zones (EPZ) around potential major technological accidents sites

Yves Dubeau, Éric Clément, Dimitri Tsingakis, and Pierre Drolet

Insurers in Canada and worldwide have a long history of raising awareness of the need to adapt to the increasing risks we face as a result of a changing climate. Over a decade ago, Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC), which represents the majority of home, car and business insurers in Canada, made adapting to climate change a national strategic priority. Today, we continue to aggressively advocate for a whole-of-society approach that recognizes that governments, emergency management organizations, the insurance industry and the public all have a role in addressing the challenges we face.

The most important message IBC continues to communicate is that the risks posed by climate change are not a future threat; they are a present danger.

Read more

Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) Naval Lieutenant (Lt(N)) Karen O'Connell of St. John's, Newfoundland, carries a stack of sauce pans from a cooking facility in the Mississippi Coast Coliseum and Convention Center. Lt(N) O'Connell was deployed to the US in support of the Hurricane Katrina relief operations.

Nature-Triggered Disasters and the Involvement of Armed Forces: Exploring a Civil-Military Collaborative Framework

Kawser Ahmed, C. Emdad Haque, Nirupama Agrawal, and Mohammed Sadman Sakib                                

Nature-triggered disasters have been causing havoc in Canada over the past decade. Although many of these hazards cannot be prevented (e.g., earthquakes), their impacts can be managed through judicious planning and by mobilizing national resources. Considering the relentless force of nature and the degree of anticipation and preparedness needed, Canadian civil and military institutions must synergize to optimally utilize human capital, knowledge, and financial resources. Both the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) and civil society actors have emphasized the importance of enhancing adaptive capacity and reliance on the armed forces for disaster response. As such, frequent involvement in domestic responses diverts the CAF’s focus away from national and international security threats, underscoring a serious national concern. Against this backdrop, the present paper analyzes existing civil-military cooperative models in Disaster Management in Canada and the USA. Three objectives are set: a) to explore the armed forces’ main tenets and approaches to disaster and emergency management, b) to find similarities and differences in institutional and resource priorities (before and during the onset of extreme nature-triggered events), and c) to identify the best collaborative practices and modes of operation of stakeholders involved. Using a case study approach, a desktop review of policy papers and an event database for two large-scale disasters: one in the United States (Hurricane Katrina in 2005) and one in Canada (the 1997 Red River flood in Manitoba) was carried out. The results offered the following major findings: a) organizational and cultural differences between the civil and military authorities in both countries drive the nature of disaster management; b) centralization vs. resource decentralization has remained the key factor in speeding up disaster response; c) political and legal scope and limitations in civil-military cooperation are often blurred; and d) the sole application of the Command, Control, and Communication (C3) approach becomes problematic when a multi-stakeholder approach is preferred for disaster management.

Read more

From the Province of British Columbia (BC-CC-BY-NC-ND-2.0).

Supporting the role of emergent volunteers during disasters: A review of the 2021 B.C. Floods

Mahtab S. Gill, Anita Dunleavy, and Chirag R. Chopra

In the fall of 2021, British Columbia experienced an atmospheric river which caused extensive damage to public infrastructure and private property across numerous communities. In addition to the governmental response, news of civilian groups and relief efforts spearheaded by small non-government organisations (NGOs) came to light. Such stories included off-duty physicians supporting overflowing regional hospitals, volunteers working long hours to sandbag vital infrastructure, and groups of volunteer pilots airlifting essential supplies to communities cut-off by road (Karamali, 2021; Luymes, 2021; Devlin, 2021)…

Read more

Provided by Team Rubicon Canada.

Interview: Steve MacBeth, MSC, MSM, CD, Chief Operating Officer, Team Rubicon Canada

Simon Wells and Steve MacBeth

The principal of the Canadian Journal of Emergency Management interviewed the Chief Operating Officer of Team Rubicon Canada on December 7th, 2022. Read the transcript here.

Read more

"Long Way to Coquitlam" by James Wheeler (www.souvenirpixels.com) (CC-BY-NC-SA-3.0).

Climate change is not a future threat, it's a present danger

Rob de Pruis

Insurers in Canada and worldwide have a long history of raising awareness of the need to adapt to the increasing risks we face as a result of a changing climate. Over a decade ago, Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC), which represents the majority of home, car and business insurers in Canada, made adapting to climate change a national strategic priority. Today, we continue to aggressively advocate for a whole-of-society approach that recognizes that governments, emergency management organizations, the insurance industry and the public all have a role in addressing the challenges we face.

The most important message IBC continues to communicate is that the risks posed by climate change are not a future threat; they are a present danger.

Read more

  ©2022 Canadian Journal of Emergency Management

Privacy Policy   |   Terms of Use