Why CJEM?

In today’s turbulent, complex, and uncertain environment it’s necessary for disaster and emergency management communities to be able to prevail against disruption and change just over the horizon. This requires us to learn, unlearn, and relearn.

The Canadian Journal of Emergency Management (CJEM) provides a new opportunity to support professional learning and national dialogue, integrating both academic and practitioner intelligence to advance the collective knowledge of disaster and emergency management professions. This network approach to learning will foster diversity of knowledge and be inclusive of various experiences and perspectives to strengthen the profession, and support capacity for adaptive leadership.

If you are a practitioner, we welcome your contributions to the papers, the discussions, and to shaping what this journal looks like. Really. Please let us know what you want to see in CJEM by responding to our brief survey (it will take less than 5 minutes of your time).

Our goal is to go beyond the “purely theoretical” and to provide collective knowledge that can support strategies that can be operationalized by front-line practitioners. By weaving together academic research and practitioner-based experience and creating a forum for contributions to the body of knowledge, we hope to enhance interoperability by breaking down silos and communication barriers between practitioners.

If emergency managers are to lead resilience efforts in the 21st century, we need to keep pace with trends, new technologies, emerging issues and evolving best practices that can support a whole-of-society approach. This journal seeks to examine issues with a holistic, synergistic angle to creating positive, sustainable approaches to disaster and emergency management.

At CJEM we welcome contributions dealing with all phases of disasters and emergencies, ranging from risk reduction, prevention and mitigation, preparedness, response, recovery and remediation, as well as suggestions for adaptation for future disasters and emergencies.

CJEM Advisory Board
Nirupama Agrawal, Scott Blandford, Donna Dupont, Alex Valoroso, Justin Veuthey & Etsuko Yasui

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